The best roasted garlic mashed potatoes you have ever tasted are right here. So creamy, so versatile, so simple! Come join me in the kitchen as I show you how to whip up this easy side dish.

Best Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes in a white bowl with parsley and melted butter
Buttery Mashed Potatoes

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Comfort food. I believe if you look up the words comfort food in the dictionary, there would be a big beautiful bowl of mashed potatoes on the page.

And like I said, they are so versatile. Perfect for a weeknight family meal, or a large holiday dinner.

The beauty of a recipe like this is you can tailor it to suit your family’s needs and preferences. A recipe the whole family will love!

I used Yukon golds here, but you can use basically any potato you have on hand. Red potatoes and russet potatoes work beautifully in this recipe too.

Love potatoes with the peels left on? Do it. Are you more of a no peels kind of crew? You can do that too. Make this recipe your own.

You can even make adjustments to make this dairy free. Mashed potatoes are like a delicious, cozy blank canvas for your individual tastes. So let’s get to the kitchen!

Cut potatoes in a white bowl on the table, ready to make Best Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Diced potatoes

How to make roasted garlic mashed potatoes?

The essential but simple ingredients are: Yukon gold potatoes (or the kind of potatoes you prefer), heavy cream, head of garlic, olive oil, butter, salt and black pepper.

What you will need: a potato peeler (if you want to peel them), large bowl, knife, cutting board, piece of aluminum foil, either a hand held potato masher, a stand mixer, a large pot, small saucepan, and a serving bowl.

Optional: potato ricer

Now that you know what you need, let’s get started!

  • First, we need to roast the garlic! Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Cut off the top of the heads of garlic. This recipe only calls for one head of garlic, but I like to roast a few at a time and freeze them so it reduces a step the next time I make these potatoes.
  • After you cut off the top of the head of garlic, place it in aluminum foil (if you prefer not to place the garlic directly on the foil, do what I do and put a piece of parchment paper inside the foil to act as a barrier).
  • Drizzle olive oil (or avocado oil) over the entire head of garlic. I also like to sprinkle sea salt on top.
  • Wrap up and place in your preheated oven for 1 hour, or until brown and tender.

While your garlic is roasting, take your potatoes and give them a good wash. Then you can either peel them for skins off, or cut the potatoes into quarters for skins left on.

Once your potatoes are cut into 2-inch pieces, place potatoes in a large pot of cold water, on medium-high heat. Use enough water to completely cover the potatoes.

Your potatoes will cook more evenly if slowly brought to a boil rather than dumping them in to already boiling water. I also add a teaspoon of salt to my water.

Boil until tender, for about 20-30 minutes. Test if the potatoes are fork tender. Drain potatoes, but save the potato water.

Mash it up! Use what you have on hand whether that is a fork and some muscle, a hand held potato masher, or a stand mixer to mash potatoes.

How much you mash, depends on the texture you prefer.

Pro tip: Using a potato ricer before mashing may add a step, but makes your mashed potatoes exceptionally smooth. I personally prefer using my stand mixer.

You will also want to remove the cloves of garlic from its paper layers and use a fork to turn the roasted garlic into a creamy garlic paste.

Combine all remaining ingredients. Add mashed garlic, heavy cream, 1/4 cup of reserved cooking water, melted butter, salt and pepper to your potatoes.

Add either more heavy cream or more potato water to achieve your desired creamy texture.

Finishing touches! Place into a beautiful serving bowl, add your favorite garnishes (ideas below!) and don’t be afraid to have seconds.

In fact you might want to make a double batch! The leftovers make fantastic potato pancakes or filling for pierogi. Enjoy!

Whole potatoes in a white bowl next to a vintage embroidered tea towel and wooden utensils, preparing to make Best Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes.
Whole Potatoes

What is the trick to good mashed potatoes?

The roasted garlic cloves definitely up this recipe! As I mentioned above, I like to roast a few heads of garlic at once.

Roasting makes the creamiest garlic, and you can utilize it for so many other recipes too! Like garlic butter for homemade garlic bread. Yum!

The garlic bulb freezes really well or will last for about 3 days in an airtight container in the fridge. This great garlic flavor makes this our favorite way to add potatoes to a weeknight dinner or a thanksgiving table.

The other not so secret ingredient for this easy recipe is the heavy cream and not holding back on the butter. The heavy cream really sets off the creamy flavor and makes these the smoothest mashed potatoes.

Pro tip: Warm up the heavy cream before incorporating into the mashed potatoes. Using cold cream will cool off the potatoes and will affect the texture.

Another trick is using a potato ricer. If you have one on hand, it really ups the fluffy texture.

You can add two heads of roasted garlic, if you love extra garlic.

Helpful hints and substitutions!

Garnish ideas: The following are ideas for ways to snazz up this great recipe. But don’t worry, if you are a minimalist, these potatoes are great on their own. Chives, sour cream, extra butter to drizzle on top,

You can roast a bunch of garlic ahead of time and freeze them. Make sure they are in an airtight container that is freezer safe. I recommend freezing them whole, the taste seems to remain richer if left whole to freeze.

For the roasted garlic, leave the outer paper layer on for roasting, then peel off once the head of garlic is cool enough to handle.

Don’t have heads of garlic on hand? No problem! Instead of roasted garlic: add an additional tablespoon of butter and use minced garlic or a teaspoon of garlic powder instead of roasting a garlic clove.

Use sour cream instead of heavy cream, if it is what you have on hand.

Unsalted butter is best to use if you want to be able to control the saltiness. Then you can add salt to taste. If you are like our family and enjoy salty things, then you can use salted butter and again, just salt to taste. Either type of butter you have on hand can be used here.

Need to make this recipe dairy free? Use your favorite cooking oil in place of butter and any dairy free milk alternative will work in place of the heavy cream.

Baking the potatoes instead of boiling can free up precious stove top space, especially helpful when cooking a large holiday meal. Simply roast them in the oven with some olive oil at 425 degrees F for 35 minutes.

To replace the cooking water, you can use a vegetable broth or any other broth you have on hand. Just know that a strong broth, like beef, will affect the flavor of the mashed potatoes.

You can make these roasted garlic mashed potatoes the day before and reheat, just stir in a little more melted butter if they get dry.

Want a simple way to transport this side dish to a potluck or a holiday party? You can make these potatoes the night before and put in a crockpot or slow cooker for easy transport. Just be sure to add additional cream and butter (or the substitutions you are using) to keep the potatoes from getting dry.

Kind of off topic: If you are a gardener who composts, save your potato skins (if you peel your potatoes) and add them to your compost. Less waste and a more nutrient rich garden!

Still have a bunch of potato water leftover? Use it in bread making, muffins or biscuits. There are many recipes that you can use your potato water in, to add starch to.

Best Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes in a white bowl with parsley and melted butter

Best Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Yield: 4-6 servings
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

These creamy and garlicy mashed potatoes are sure to wow a crowd. Simple ingredients and easy steps deliver a recipe that you will make again and again. Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 head of Garlic, whole
  • Olive Oil, to drizzle
  • Redmond's Real Salt
  • 3 pounds Potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 1/4 cup Cooking Water, leftover from boiling potatoes
  • 1/2 cup Heavy Cream
  • 1 stick of Butter
  • Salt, to taste
  • Black Pepper, to taste
  • Optional: toppings such as chives, parsley, sour cream, additional butter

Instructions

    1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
    2. Cut off the top of the heads of garlic. You can only use one head of garlic, but I like to roast a few at a time and freeze them so it reduces a step the next time I make this recipe.
    3. After you cut off the top of the head of garlic, place it in aluminum foil (if you prefer not to place the garlic directly on the foil, do what I do and put a piece of parchment paper inside the foil to act as a barrier).
    4. Drizzle olive oil (or avocado oil) over the entire head of garlic. I also like to sprinkle sea salt on top.
    5. Wrap up and place in your preheated oven for 1 hour, or until brown and tender.
    6. While your garlic is roasting, take your potatoes and give them a good wash. Then you can either peel them for skins off, or cut the potatoes into quarters for skins left on.
    7. Once your potatoes are cut into 2-inch pieces, place potatoes in a large pot of cold water, on medium-high heat. Use enough water to completely cover the potatoes. Your potatoes will cook more evenly if slowly brought to a boil rather than dumping them into already boiling water. I also add a teaspoon of salt to my water.
    8. Boil until tender, for about 20 minutes. Test if the potatoes are fork tender. Drain potatoes, but save the potato water.
    9. Mash it up! Use what you have on hand whether that is a fork and some muscle, a hand held potato masher, or a stand mixer to mash potatoes. How much you mash, depends on the texture you prefer. Pro tip: Using a potato ricer before mashing may add a step, but makes your mashed potatoes exceptionally smooth.
    10. You will also want to remove the cloves of garlic from its paper layers and use a fork to turn the roasted garlic into a creamy garlic paste.
    11. Combine all remaining ingredients. Add mashed garlic, heavy cream, 1/2 cup of reserved cooking water, melted butter, salt and pepper to your potatoes. Add either more heavy cream or more potato water to achieve your desired creamy texture.
    12. Finishing touches! Place into a beautiful serving bowl, add your favorite garnishes (ideas below!) and don't be afraid to have seconds. In fact you might want to make a double batch! The leftovers make fantastic potato pancakes or filling for pierogies. Enjoy!

Notes

The roasted garlic cloves definitely up this recipe! As I mentioned above, I like to roast a few heads of garlic at once. Roasting makes the creamiest garlic, and you can utilize it for so many other recipes too! Like garlic butter for homemade garlic bread. Yum!

The garlic bulb freezes really well or will last for about 3 days in an airtight container in the fridge. This great garlic flavor makes this our favorite way to add potatoes to a weeknight dinner or a thanksgiving table.

The other not so secret ingredient for this easy recipe is the heavy cream and not holding back on the butter. The heavy cream really sets off the creamy flavor and makes these the smoothest mashed potatoes. Pro tip: Warm up the heavy cream before incorporating into the mashed potatoes. Using cold cream will cool off the potatoes and will affect the texture.

Another trick is using a potato ricer. If you have one on hand, it really gives the potatoes a smooth, fluffy texture.

Garnish ideas: The following are ideas for ways to snazz up this great recipe. But don't worry, if you are a minimalist, these potatoes are great on their own. Chives, sour cream, extra butter to drizzle on top,

You can roast a bunch of garlic ahead of time and freeze them. Make sure they are in an airtight container that is freezer safe. I recommend freezing them whole, the taste seems to remain richer if left whole to freeze.

For the roasted garlic, leave the outer paper layer on for roasting, then peel off once the head of garlic is cool enough to handle.

Don't have heads of garlic on hand? No problem! Instead of roasted garlic: add an additional tablespoon of butter and use minced garlic or a teaspoon of garlic powder instead of roasting a garlic clove.

Use sour cream instead of heavy cream, if it is what you have on hand.

Unsalted butter is best to use if you want to be able to control the saltiness. Then you can add salt to taste. If you are like our family and enjoy salty things, then you can use salted butter and again, just salt to taste. Either type of butter you have on hand can be used here.

Need to make this recipe dairy free? Use your favorite cooking oil in place of butter and any dairy free milk alternative will work in place of the heavy cream.

Baking the potatoes instead of boiling can free up precious stove top space, especially helpful when cooking a large holiday meal. Simply roast them in the oven with some olive oil at 425 degrees F for 35 minutes. To replace the cooking water, you can use a vegetable broth or any other broth you have on hand. Just know that a strong broth, like beef, will affect the flavor of the mashed potatoes.

You can make these roasted garlic mashed potatoes the day before and reheat, just stir in a little more melted butter if they get dry.

Want a simple way to transport this side dish to a potluck or a holiday party? You can make these potatoes the night before and put in a crockpot or slow cooker for easy transport. Just be sure to add additional cream and butter (or the substitutions you are using) to keep the potatoes from getting dry.

Kind of off topic: If you are a gardener who composts, save your potato skins (if you peel your potatoes) and add them to your compost. Less waste and a more nutrient rich garden!

Still have a bunch of potato water leftover? Use it in bread making, muffins or biscuits. There are many recipes that you can use your potato water in, to add starch to.

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

one last thing…

Planning to try this? I’d love to hear what you think in the comments below! If you loved this article, I would love it if you gave it 5 stars!

Also, let me know what you think of it and what you will use it for by tagging me @_thecultivationofcozy_  on Instagram or at The Cultivation of Cozy on Facebook!

Snap a photo and use the hashtag #thecultivationofcozy to join in the community! I can’t wait to see it!

Pin image for Best Roasted Mashed Potatoes with bowl of mashed potatoes in center. Top says Best Roasted Mashed Potatoes. Bottom says the cultivation of cozy dot com.

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